mole vole trap prevention

Mole vs. Vole

To prevent mole and vole infestation it’s important to know the difference between them:

Moles

Voles

Characteristics

Size: 6-8 inches
Fur type: textured
Color: grey or black
Claws: long front claws
Proboscis: long and hairless

They look like most rodents.
Size: 4-9 inches
Color: brown or gray

Features and Behaviors

They’re mainly active in the summer and spring. In the winter and fall, the further burrow underground, eating the worm and burrowing insects.

They’re usually active in the early morning and at night – when they feel fewer vibrations, they know it’s safe to come out.

Moles burrow 12-18 inches underground. They eat earthworms, grubs, insects, and small invertebrates.

Their runways are very subtle, they don’t leave any mounds behind. 

They’re omnivorous – their favorite food is the roots of plants and tree barks, but they also eat small insects. 

Voles reproduce at a high rate. A female vole can reproduce six to ten times a year and she can give birth to five to ten young voles per litter. The average lifespan of a vole is between three to six months.

Features and Signs they’re in your backyard

Moles tend to leave large dirt mounds. You’ll also find tracks of dead vegetation. 

Even if you don’t see them (since they rarely surface), you can see some of their tunnels. 

Voles are more subtle – their tunnels are smaller, and so are their entries. To find a vole infestation, look for three-inch holes in the ground. 

Another sign of vole presence is dead vegetation because the voles eat every vegetable root or bulb around. 

If you own a vegetable or fruit garden, you’ll notice that the plants may begin to wilt or stop growing — lookout for chewing marks on bushes, tree bark, and plants.

Voles build their nests near trees with dry sticks and straw. Their nests can house up to 70 voles!

Now you’re ready to move on to the next step, preventing their infestation:

How To Prevent Moles:

Water your lawn only when needed! Wet and soft soil makes your garden easier for moles to burrow. If your yard is soggy and waterlogged, it will be very inviting for moles.

Use a sonic spike. It emits a high pitch noise that scares the moles away. Moles prefer less movement when they’re looking for food. ; the sonic spike serves as an underground scarecrow. Once you’ve buried the spike, it serves as a sound mine and goes off when burrowing creatures are near it.

How To Prevent Voles:

Keep your lawn cut low: voles are attracted to vegetation – so the trimmed lawn can be an excellent buffet for many rodents.

Make a natural repellent: the vole is sensitive to strong smells. A household remedy is to grind up black pepper, cayenne pepper, capsicum, garlic, and vegetable oil with water and spread them on your lawn. It’ll make the ground smell unbearable and keep them away. 

Voles like to be covered: be careful when applying Mulch – a covering usually placed around plants to prevent weeds growth. If you place it too close to trees and shrubs, the voles will feel empowered by the presence of a deep layer of Mulch.

Voles like hide in the snow and attack your landscape, especially when it snows. Try to clear the snow away from shrubs and young trees. Another way of protecting your trees is by wrapping a wire mesh around the lower trunk.

If you continue to find tracks of moles and voles here’s how to trap the humanly using our traps:

How To Trap Moles:

Where you place the trap is essential to your success.
Using your hand or a towel, flatten the sections of raised soil edges of the tunnel.

Mark these sections with a ribbon tied to a stick – to make it easy to relocate the traps.

Check back the ridges you’ve flattened within a day. If you see that the ridges were pushed back – the tunnel is active.

Last but not least, cut the turf over the active tunnel and remove the soil down where the moles have created their path. Set the trap on the moles’ path. Because moles don’t see very well, they’ll stumble right into the trap. Although their eyesight is weak, they’re still sensitive to touch. Don’t leave loose soil in the path leading to the trap – or the moles will detect it and back off.

How To Trap Voles:

Place the trap where you see signs of activity. Place as many vole traps as you can – they tend to wander around in big groups. Also, make sure you can keep track of all the pitfalls, so the voles won’t end up stuck in the traps for too long. The best baits to lour voles effectively are bread and butter, small nuts, cherry pit, and oatmeal. Make sure to place the bait inside the trap and around it.

 

To prevent mole and vole infestation it’s important to know the difference between them:

Moles

Characteristics

Size: 6-8 inches
Fur type: textured
Color: grey or black
Claws: long front claws
Proboscis: long and hairless

Features and Behaviors

They’re mainly active in the summer and spring. In the winter and fall the burrow further underground eating worm and burrowing insects.

They’re usually active in the early morning and at night – when they feel fewer vibrations, they know it’s safe to come out.

Moles burrow 12-18 inches underground. They eat earthworms, grubs, insects and small invertebrates.

Features and Signs they’re in your backyard

Moles tend to leave large dirt mounds. You’ll also find tracks of dead vegetation.

Even if you don’t see them (since they almost never surface), you can see some of their tunnels. 

Voles

Characteristics

They look like most rodents.
Size: 4-9 inches
Color: brown or gray

Features and Behaviors

Their runways are very subtle, they don’t leave any mounds behind.

They’re omnivorous – their favorite food is the roots of plants and tree barks, but they also eat small insects.

Voles reproduce at a high rate. A female vole can reproduce six to ten times a year and she can give birth to five to ten young voles per litter. The average lifespan of a vole is between three to six months.

Features and Signs they’re in your backyard

Voles are more subtle – their tunnels are smaller and so are their entries. To find a vole infestation, look for three-inch holes in the ground.

Another sign of vole presence is dead vegetation because the voles eat every vegetable root or bulb around.

If you own a vegetable or fruit garden, you’ll notice that the plants may begin to wilt or stop growing. Lookout for chewing marks on bushes, tree bark, and plants.

Voles build their nests near trees with dry sticks and straw. Their nests can house up to 70 voles!

Now you’re ready to move on to the next step, preventing their infestation:

How To Prevent Moles:

Water your lawn only when needed! Wet and soft soil makes your lawn easier for moles to burrow. If your yard will be soggy and wet, it will be very inviting for moles.

Use a sonic spike. It emits a high pitch noise that scares the moles away. Moles prefer less movement when they’re looking for food, the sonic spike serves as an underground scarecrow. Once it’s buried it serves as a sound mine and goes off when burrowing creatures are near it.

How To Prevent Voles:

Keep your lawn cut low: voles are attracted to vegetation – so the trimmed lawn can be a great buffet for many rodents.

Make a natural repellent: vole are sensitive to strong smells. A household remedy is to grind up cayenne pepper, black pepper, garlic, capsicum, and vegetable oil with water and spread them on your lawn. It’ll make the ground smell unbearable and keep them away.

Voles like to be covered:
be careful when applying Mulch – a covering usually placed around plants to prevent weeds growth. If you’ll place it too close to trees and shrubs the voles will feel empowered by the presence of a deep layer of Mulch.
Voles like using snow in the winter to attack your landscape. Try to clear the snow away from shrubs and young trees. Another way of protecting your tress is by wrapping a wire mesh around the lower trunk.

If you continue to find tracks of moles and voles here’s how to trap the humanly using our traps:

How To Trap Moles:

Where you place the trap is extremely important to your success.
Using your hand or a trowel, flatten the sections of raised soil edges of the tunnel.

Mark these sections with a ribbon tied to a stick – to make it easy to relocate the traps.

Check back within a day, to check the ridges you’ve flattened. If you see that the ridges are pushed back – the tunnel is definitely active.

Last but not least, cut the turf over the active tunnel and remove the soil down where the moles have created their path. This is where you should set your traps – these are the active feeding tunnels! Because moles don’t see very well, they’ll stumble right into the trap. Although their eyesight is weak,they’re still sensitive to touch. Don’t leave loose soil in the path leading to the trap – or the moles will detect it and back off.

How To Trap Voles:

Place the trap where you see signs of activity.
Place as many vole traps as you can – they tend to wander around in big groups. Also, make sure you can keep track of all the traps, so the voles won’t end up stuck in the traps for too long.
The best baits to lour voles effectively are bread and butter, small nuts, cherry pit, and oatmeal. Make sure to place the bait inside the trap and around it.

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